Consumer Action Law Group Shows How to Sue Employers for Illegal Employer Practices

Employees Protected from Unlawful Termination Under Employment Laws

Employment lawyers at Consumer Action Law Group are showing how to sue employers for illegal employer practices. They state that employees are protected from unlawful termination under employment laws, such as the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Numerous employees have suffered from illegal employer practices, such as:

  • being fired for criticizing employer’s unlawful actions,
  • getting paid less than the minimum set by law,
  • not being paid for working overtime, or
  • being discriminated due to age, sex, or religion.

Employers are not permitted to carry out these kinds of practices at their workplace. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) reported that about 91,000 charges were filed for some kind of discrimination at the workplace. Note that these numbers are excluding other forms of unfair workplace practices, such as being terminated for pointing out employer’s illegal actions. Employees are strongly encouraged to seek out an employment lawyer if they have experienced any kind of illegal employer behaviors at their workplace.

Can Employees Sue Their Employer for Firing Them?

Circumstances at workplace determine whether or not employees can sue their employers for firing them. If the employees have broken the terms of agreement they signed, it is completely fair for employers to fire them. However, if the main reason for the termination is due to employees criticizing employer’s illegal actions, then they can file a lawsuit against the employer for violating the FLSA. As Yelena Gurevich, an employment lawyer at Consumer Action Law Group, states: “your employer cannot fire you for reporting illegal acts performed by the employer.”

Employees can also sue their employers if they fired them for:

  • Not following their orders that break a law,
  • Not being able to work due to disabilities,
  • Criticizing their workplace, or
  • Complaining about their wages.

Many would assume that the number of discriminatory terminations would decrease with the increasing access to employment laws, but that is not the case. Going back to the EEOC statistics, the average complaints related to discrimination at the workplace is about 93,400, a little bit higher than the 2016 numbers. Discrimination at workplace is still going strong, and it is up to employees to recognize it and have an employment lawyer defend them against such actions.

When to Sue Employers: Watch Out for Harassment

Employees can sue their employers for harassment at workplace. Sexual harassment is another big part of illegal employer practices. In most harassment cases, the employee experiences some form of unwanted sexual, visual, verbal, or physical contact from their employer. According to a survey conducted by Cosmopolitan, about 1 out of 3 female workers between 18-34 has experienced some sort of sexual harassment. And of those sexually harassed, 71% did not report the act. When any worker is sexually harassment at work, they should know that they can sue the employers for the illegal workplace practice.

Illegal employer practices have been around and are still, unfortunately, an ongoing issue in the workplace today. When employees are wrongfully terminated or facing unethical behaviors by their employers, they have the right to file a lawsuit against them. Employees looking to sue their employers for illegal employer practices can get in touch with one of Consumer Action Law Group’s employment lawyers at (818) 254-8413. They give free consultations.


About Consumer Action Law Group of Panzarella, Gurevich & Rode, P.C.: Consumer Action Law Group is a law firm based in Los Angeles that is dedicated to protecting consumer rights. Their lawyers are experienced in the following areas of practice: auto fraud, bankruptcy, car accident, credit report dispute (FCRA), employment law, mortgage fraud, surplus funds recovery, foreclosures, and TCPA violations

Consumer Action Law Group Shows How to Sue Employers for Illegal Employer Practices
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